Rep. Clites: GOP Election Bill Sets Stage For Confusion And Chaos In November
Says bill does little to prepare for presidential election amid pandemic
June 04, 2020
 
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COLUMBUS—Rep. Randi Clites (D-Ravenna) issued a statement today as Republican lawmakers voted to fast-track legislationthat does little to prepare the state’s Boards of Elections to safely conduct a presidential election amid the worst global pandemic in more than a century.


House Bill (HB) 680 shortens the time for voters to request absentee ballots, eliminates the ability for the secretary of state to prepay return postage for ballot applications, and bars the Health Director and other officials from affecting the conduct of elections—even at the risk of public health.


“We should be making voting more accessible and convenient, not making it harder and more confusing to vote,” Rep. Clites said. “This bill was rushed, lacked public support, and was not recommended by any elections experts. We need commonsense election laws that secure the right to vote.”


The bill stands in stark contrast to the Democrats’ proposal, HB 687, which would expand online registration, make it easier for Ohioans to vote by mail, and protect safe, accessible in-person voting opportunities amid the coronavirus pandemic, which has killed more than 2,000 Ohioans.


Democrats offered several amendments on the floor, including:



  • Removing the prohibition on officials from affecting the conduct of elections, which would limit the ability of Ohio Department of Health Director Dr. Amy Acton to determine if in-person voting is safe this November, which was sponsored by Rep. Allison Russo (D-Upper Arlington).

  • Allowing the secretary of state to prepay return postage for ballot applications and absentee ballots, sponsored by Rep. Bride Rose Sweeney (D-Cleveland).

  • Removing confusion by allowing ballots to be postmarked by Election Day, rather than the day before Election Day, which was sponsored by Rep. Catherine Ingram (D-Cincinnati).

  • Mailing ballots to every voter for this November’s presidential election, sponsored by Rep. Michele Lepore-Hagan (D-Youngstown).

  • Removing language that ends Early Voting at 6 p.m. the Friday before the election, sponsored by Rep. Paula Hicks-Hudson (D-Toledo).


Republicans rejected each of the Democratic amendments along party lines. 


After a party-line vote, HB 680 now moves to the Senate for consideration.


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