Rep. Antonio: Energy Standards Freeze Will Cost Ohio's Economy, Consumers And Environment
Ohio to become first state to move backward on energy efficiency standards
 
 

On Wednesday, State Rep. Nickie J. Antonio (D-Lakewood) voted against Senate Bill 310, legislation to suspend Ohio’s—by most accounts, successful—advanced energy standards. These standards, passed by the legislature in 2008 with wide bipartisan support, have created thousands of jobs and saved $1.03 billion for Ohio consumers and businesses.


“Republicans are taking Ohio backwards with this destructive anti-environment, anti-business, anti-consumer legislation,” said Rep. Antonio.


Projections estimate that if the standards were kept in place, Ohio consumers and businesses would enjoy over $4 billion in potential savings over the next 10 years. With the two-year freeze, however, Ohio energy rates will increase for ratepayers by $150, while rates will increase for commercial customers by $31,000. The energy standards freeze could result in a $6 billion loss of potential capital investment. 


“It is unconscionable to remove the Buy Ohio portion of the current standards and is a blow to local businesses,” said Rep. Antonio.


The controversial bill was widely expected to pass the House last week, but the bill was pulled from the committee schedule at the last minute. After struggling to find support from their members, the GOP pushed the bill through committee Tuesday.


The bill makes Ohio the first state to reverse Renewable Portfolio Standards by eliminating targets for advanced energy and freezing targets for renewable energy.

 
 
 
  
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Antonio Responds To Latest Ohio Opioid Crisis Report

 

The lead Democrat on the Ohio House’s Health Committee, Democratic Whip and state Rep. Nickie J. Antonio (D-Lakewood), today responded to the latest dire report on Ohio’s statewide opioid overdose and addiction emergency.

The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences released the report “Taking Measure of Ohio’s Opioid Crisis” Tuesday, highlighting the grim realities many in the state are experiencing, but also making a case for greater treatment access and expanded educational and economic opportunities for Ohioans.

“This report confirms that treatment is necessary to stem the tide of this opioid crisis, and clearly we do not have enough treatment options currently available,” said Antonio. “We can do better. We must do better. Taxpayers deserve better economic opportunities, a strong and affordable educational foundation, and greater access to healthcare services – all things that we know will prevent opioid addiction and abuse.”

The report points to low education levels and limited job opportunities as central underlying causes of opioid abuse.