Democratic Women's Caucus Calls For House Vote On "Bring Back Our Girls" Resolution
Lawmakers say lives of kidnapped teenagers deserve legislative attention
 
 

Members of the Ohio House Democratic Women’s Caucus sent a letter to Speaker Batchelder today requesting full consideration on the House floor for the “Bring Back Our Girls” Resolution that was introduced last week.


The group of legislators say in the letter that, “given the severity of the situation and interest and the interest it has garnered from members, it seems fitting that the full House would consider the resolution before summer recess.”


Since 2013, the House has passed some 17 resolutions urging federal attention on a variety of topics, which include supporting the rescue efforts of a United States prisoner of war.


 


A copy of the letter can be seen below:


 


May 22, 2014


 


Dear Speaker Batchelder,


 


We write to respectfully request that you swiftly move Rep. Kathleen Clyde’s “Bring Back Our Girls” Resolution to the House floor for full consideration. There seems to be great interest in debating the merits of the resolution from members on both sides of the aisle. And, given the severity of the situation and the interest it has garnered from members, it seems fitting that the full House would consider the resolution before summer recess.


On the night of April 14, militants from the terrorist group Boko Haram kidnapped nearly 300 teenaged girls from the Government Girls Secondary School in rural Chibok, Nigeria. While this situation has not yet been rectified, we are encouraged by White House efforts to assist in the safe return of these young women.


Offering support to the efforts of the White House during this time of crisis is in line with current practice, as the House has already passed some 17 resolutions since 2013 urging federal attention for a variety of topics, including one urging the federal government to “do everything possible to rescue United States prisoner of war Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl.” We trust you would agree that the lives of close to 300 teenaged girls are similarly deserving of the House’s full attention.


We believe that other members of the legislature deserve the opportunity to unite in sending a message of support from our state to the nation, and indeed, world.


By pledging your support and allowing the House to debate the merits of the resolution, you are upholding democracy and allowing your legislators the opportunity to come together in the name of justice. We implore you to consider our request, and let Ohio offer its support to the people affected by this significant tragedy.


 


Respectfully,


 


Rep. Nickie Antonio         Rep. Debbie Phillips          Rep. Tracy Maxwell Heard         Rep. Alicia Reece


Rep. Kathleen Clyde        Rep. Connie Pillich            Rep. Teresa Fedor                  Rep. Barbara Boyd 


Rep. Heather Bishoff       Rep. Sandra Williams        Rep. Denise Driehaus

 
 
 
  
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Antonio Responds To Latest Ohio Opioid Crisis Report

 

The lead Democrat on the Ohio House’s Health Committee, Democratic Whip and state Rep. Nickie J. Antonio (D-Lakewood), today responded to the latest dire report on Ohio’s statewide opioid overdose and addiction emergency.

The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences released the report “Taking Measure of Ohio’s Opioid Crisis” Tuesday, highlighting the grim realities many in the state are experiencing, but also making a case for greater treatment access and expanded educational and economic opportunities for Ohioans.

“This report confirms that treatment is necessary to stem the tide of this opioid crisis, and clearly we do not have enough treatment options currently available,” said Antonio. “We can do better. We must do better. Taxpayers deserve better economic opportunities, a strong and affordable educational foundation, and greater access to healthcare services – all things that we know will prevent opioid addiction and abuse.”

The report points to low education levels and limited job opportunities as central underlying causes of opioid abuse.