Bill To Provide First-time Funding For Rape Crisis Centers Clears House
Proposal includes $2 million over next two years, trust fund and victim advocates
 
 

The Ohio House unanimously approved Substitute House Bill 108 today, legislation to provide first-time funding to some 27 rape crisis programs throughout the state by appropriating $2 million from the General Revenue Fund.  HB 108 also establishes a Rape Crisis Program Trust Fund administered by the Attorney General and funded through registration fees of sex offenders, new fines for sexually oriented offenses and donations.


“This legislation is long overdue,” said Rep. Antonio. “For the thousands of survivors of sexual assault there is new hope for healing through programs that could be supported throughout Ohio by this bill.”


The State Victims Assistance Advisory Council, which provides recommendations and advocacy for victim services and polices, would gain two new members under HB 108.


If the bill becomes law, Ohio would be more in line with neighboring states that provide dedicated state funding for similar rape crisis programs and services. Currently, Ohio’s network of rape crisis programs provides coverage to 37 counties and receives no state funding.

 
 
 
  
Featured Posts

Antonio Responds To Latest Ohio Opioid Crisis Report

 

The lead Democrat on the Ohio House’s Health Committee, Democratic Whip and state Rep. Nickie J. Antonio (D-Lakewood), today responded to the latest dire report on Ohio’s statewide opioid overdose and addiction emergency.

The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences released the report “Taking Measure of Ohio’s Opioid Crisis” Tuesday, highlighting the grim realities many in the state are experiencing, but also making a case for greater treatment access and expanded educational and economic opportunities for Ohioans.

“This report confirms that treatment is necessary to stem the tide of this opioid crisis, and clearly we do not have enough treatment options currently available,” said Antonio. “We can do better. We must do better. Taxpayers deserve better economic opportunities, a strong and affordable educational foundation, and greater access to healthcare services – all things that we know will prevent opioid addiction and abuse.”

The report points to low education levels and limited job opportunities as central underlying causes of opioid abuse.