Rep. Lepore-Hagan: House Republicans Vote To Protect The Confederate Flag
Says symbols of racism, white supremacy, and treason have no place in Ohio
 
 

COLUMBUS—While Ohioans were sleeping, House Democratic lawmakers were offering two amendments on the House floor late Thursday and early Friday that would have prohibited the sale, display, possession or distribution of Confederate memorabilia at county and independent fairs, following a similar rule instituted by the Ohio State Fair in 2015. The motions came during floor debate on House Bill 665, which made several other changes to laws on local and county fairs. The U.S. MarinesU.S. Navy and NASCAR recently announced similar bans on Confederate memorabilia. Republicans rejected the amendments largely along party lines, voting instead to protect the sale of the Confederate flag. 


“The Confederate flag does not mean you’re a rebel. It does not mean pride in where you’re from. It is a symbol of fear and hatred. A symbol that you were willing to die in a war to keep slavery legal,” said Rep. Lepore-Hagan (D-Youngstown). “We need to show our African American brothers and sisters that this symbol of racism shown or flown is offensive and represents a racist wave in the face of humanity. It is time we stand up for ALL Americans and declare that this Ohio can no longer support any form of racism.” 


The amendments come amid continued demonstrations in dozens of cities and towns across Ohio where protesters have called for an end to police brutality, white supremacy and racism in the United States following the police-involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.


A second Democratic amendment would have cut state funding to county and independent fairs who allow the sale of Confederate memorabilia. Republicans tabled that amendment as well.


House Bill 665 passed the House and now moves to the Senate for consideration.


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