COLUMBUS - 

State Representative Louis Blessing (R-Colerain Township) today announced that the Ohio House of Representatives concurred with the Ohio Senate’s changes to House Bill 202, legislation that he originally sponsored. Rep. Blessing’s bill was originally passed unanimously by the Ohio House in October of 2013. From there, it went to the Ohio Senate where it also passed unanimously on February 4th.


House Bill 202 makes changes to the examination, reporting, and educational requirements of professional engineers and surveyors. In particular, the legislation modernizes the testing process, which under current law includes “paper and pencil” testing only. A conversion to computerized testing would be implemented with the bill. Such tests would be offered at computer testing centers, which allow new graduates the ability to take exams at their convenience and at locations closer to them.


Further, the bill also renames the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology “ABET, Inc.” as it relates to the Professional Engineers and Professional Surveyors Law. It makes changes to educational requirements by converting surveying course hours to semester hours from quarter hours and by extending the duration of a certificate issued from one year to two years.


Significant interested parties like the State Board of Registration for Professional Engineers and Surveyors and the Professional Land Surveyors of Ohio demonstrated important support for the bill.


Representative Blessing said, “I'd like to thank the House, Senate, and Governor for supporting H.B. 202. This simple yet common sense legislation will give aspiring engineers more opportunities to become licensed at a lower cost to the state. This is a big win for Ohio.”


The bill will now go to the Governor to be signed into law.

 
 
 
  
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Engineering Bill Sponsored By Rep. Blessing To Go To The Governor

 
COLUMBUS - 

State Representative Louis Blessing (R-Colerain Township) today announced that the Ohio House of Representatives concurred with the Ohio Senate’s changes to House Bill 202, legislation that he originally sponsored.