Cleveland-area Lawmakers Propose Bill To Recognize Carl And Louis Stokes
Legislation would name Opportunity Corridor after famed African American politicians
February 28, 2017
 
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State Reps. Kent Smith (D-Euclid) and Stephanie Howse (D-Cleveland) today announced the introduction of House Bill 83, legislation to designate the local boulevard known as Opportunity Corridor in Cleveland as the “Carl and Louis Stokes Opportunity Corridor.” 


“Carl and Louis Stokes not only helped reshape politics and public policy in Cleveland and Ohio, but made lasting contributions to American history,” said Smith. “With 2017 marking the 50-year anniversary of Carl Stokes becoming the first African American to lead a major city, this road designation will mark the substantive accomplishments of Carl and Louis Stokes’ work and legacy.” 


First elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1968, Congressman Louis Stokes was the first African American member of Congress from the state of Ohio. During his 15-term career at the Capitol, Congressman Stokes led the Select Committee on Assassinations that investigated the slayings of President John F. Kennedy and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., headed the Congressional Black Caucus, and was the first African American member on the powerful House Appropriations Committee. 


“The Stokes brothers made significant contributions to our state and nation through their dedicated careers in public service, and their lasting legacy still inspires younger generations even today,” said Howse. “I am proud to be a joint sponsor of legislation naming the Carl and Louis Stokes Opportunity Corridor. Together, we can help ensure Louis and Carl Stokes continue to receive the recognition they so rightfully deserve.” 


Carl Stokes, Louis’ brother, served three terms in the Ohio House of Representatives starting in 1962, working to push back against gerrymandering and engage more African Americans and women in the political process. He was also the first African American mayor for one of the nation’s ten largest cities when he was elected as mayor of Cleveland in 1965.  

 
 
 
  
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Cleveland-area Lawmakers Say Ohio Could "amp Up" Economic Growth Through Music Industry

 

State Reps. Kent Smith (D-Euclid) and Sarah LaTourette (R-Bainbridge) today announced a bi-partisan effort to create jobs and drive economic growth by making Ohio a destination for the recording industry. The Ohio Sound Recording Investor Tax Credit, also known as OhioSounds, will work to attract more of the almost $7 billion in annual music industry revenue to the state. 

“Ohio is the birthplace of legendary musicians, unforgettable songs and ‘Rock N’ Roll’,” said Rep. Smith. “OhioSounds honors our proud legacy and works to cultivate a winning model moving forward. Ohio can become a destination for musicians, producers and industry leaders who will create jobs and strengthen our local economies. The OhioSounds tax credit will solidify our commitment to Ohio’s musical heritage and create new music that will provide the soundtrack to our lives.”

“Much like the Ohio film tax credit, this legislation seeks to incentivize investment in Ohio and create jobs in a dynamic industry,” Representative LaTourette stated. “Northeast Ohio has seen quite an investment in response to the film tax credit, with major motion pictures filmed on the streets of Cleveland and throughout our region. Given our history as the birthplace of Rock n’ Roll, it just makes sense to extend that incentive to the music industry and embrace our heritage as musical innovators.”