Legislature Sends Dangerous State Government Shutdown Bill To Governor's Desk
Proposed law change would rollback checks and balances, sew costly uncertainty, chaos, political decision-making
December 09, 2016
 
[ Kathleen Clyde Home | Kathleen Clyde Press ]
 
 

In an early Friday morning House session, the Republican-controlled House rubber stamped a sweeping bill that could shut down state government by giving the legislature new power to dissolve executive-branch state agencies. The bill, Senate Bill 329, would force some 25 state agencies every four years to spend extra money and resources to defend against elimination based on a number of factors, including the potential for privatization, and a regulations evaluation against other states. 


“Not only is this sweeping transference of power an extreme and troubling departure from the American democratic foundation of checks and balances, but it puts Ohioans in danger by potentially shutting down essential services overnight,” said House Democratic Leader Fred Strahorn (D-Dayton). “This would create chaos within our state and could lead to outsourcing primary functions of the state like education, public safety, public health and workers’ compensation. It is nothing more than a power grab under the cover of night and guise of review.” 


If Gov. John Kasich signs SB 329 into law, every four years, the legislature must take affirmative action on any agency up for review or the agency is shuttered. The state legislature does maintain oversight of some executive functions currently, but the body is primarily tasked with debating and vetting proposed law changes – a slow process that traditionally leaves many proposals unreviewed. 


"SB 329 comes straight out of the Congressional playbook of government shutdown politics," said Rep. Kathleen Clyde (D-Kent). "Brinkmanship is a dangerous way to govern. I hope the governor does the responsible thing and vetoes this reckless piece of legislation." 


The bill now goes to the governor after a 1:40 a.m. vote on the House floor.

 
 
 
  
Featured Posts

Clyde Statement On U.S. Supreme Court Decisions In Gerrymandering Cases

 

State Rep. Kathleen Clyde (D-Kent) issued the following statement in response to the U.S. Supreme Court decisions in Gill v. Whitford, a Wisconsin case challenging the state’s legislative districts, and Benisek v. Lamone, a Maryland case challenging congressional districts. The court decided each case on procedural grounds without reaching the merits of plaintiffs’ partisan gerrymandering claims.



 
 

Clyde Announces The Ohio Future Voter Act To Allow Voter Pre-registration

 

State Rep. Kathleen Clyde (D-Kent) today introduced House Bill 637, the Ohio Future Voter Act, which would allow 16- and 17-year-olds to pre-register to vote. Under the bill, pre-registered Ohioans would automatically be added to the state voter rolls before the next primary or general election in which they are eligible to vote.



 
 

Clyde Announces Legislation To Close Secret Money Loopholes In Ohio Campaigns

 

State Rep. Kathleen Clyde (D-Kent) today announced her new plan to close secret money loopholes, increase transparency and strengthen the ban on foreign money in Ohio elections with new legislation, the Ohio Democracy is Strengthened by Casting Light on Spending in Elections Act, or DISCLOSE ACT.



 
 

Rep. Clyde Announces $1.23 Million In State Funds For University Improvements, Investment In Local Business

 

State Rep. Kathleen Clyde (D-Kent) today announced the release of over $1.23 million in state funds for various area projects, including improvements at the Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED), Kent State University (KSU) and Camp Ravenna.