Following months of negotiation, the Ohio House today passed Senate Joint Resolution 5, bipartisan legislation that puts a constitutional amendment before voters in May to restrict congressional gerrymandering in the state. 


“By working together and making compromises, we are at a point today where Ohioans will have better representation, fairer districts and a stronger Democracy than before,” said state Rep. Jack Cera (D-Bellaire),  a member of the legislature’s four-person congressional redistricting working group. “Voters deserve to feel like they’re being heard and that their vote counts. This bipartisan compromise will begin to bridge that divide that has put Washington’s political interests above the public’s for too long.”


Democratic House expressed concerns over several parts of the proposed plan that they see as loopholes that, in extreme cases, could still allow partisan congressional district rigging. Ultimately, most Democrats still supported the final language in the resolution.


If approved by voters in May, the reform plan will be the first time fairness criteria for congressional districts will be included in the state’s constitution. Included among the plan’s changes are the right for a citizen-led referendum on any map, the governor’s authority to veto a map, requirements to limit community and county splits, and bipartisanship requirements for a 10-year map.

 
 
 
  
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Cera: Last-minute Lawmaking Won't Make Up For 7 Years, Over $2B In Cuts To Communities

 

State lawmakers moved to pass a last-minute cash infusion for counties and local transit authorities today, on the heels of a new state auditor report showing worsening financial stability for local communities across the state.