After nearly two months of a Republican-led legislative impasse, the Ohio House is expected to resume legislative activity following today’s narrow, marathon election of new House Speaker Ryan Smith (R-Bidwell). Chaos and dysfunction have plagued the legislature since the abrupt resignation of former Speaker Cliff Rosenberger (R-Clarksville), after he announced he was under FBI inquiry in April. Federal agents have since raided Rosenberger’s home, his state office and storage shed, as rumors of pay-to-play tactics on payday lending reform legislation continue to churn.


“I am ready to get to work passing meaningful legislation for our district and the state of Ohio,” said state Rep. Glenn Holmes (D-Girard). “There were enough votes in the majority party to elect a speaker on the first round.  Eleven rounds of voting only proves that a different direction needs to happen for Ohio to move forward.”


Republican gridlock continued onto the House floor as the legislature held 11 rounds of voting to elect Smith, who becomes the first speaker in modern history to assume control of the Ohio House without securing a majority of votes. In a narrow vote, Smith was awarded the speakership under Ohio law with only 44 votes.

 
 
 
  
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Dem Lawmakers Announce Bill To Support Ohio Families During Prolonged Federal Government Shutdowns

 

State Reps. Adam Miller (D-Columbus) and Glenn Holmes (D-McDonald) today announced legislation that would ensure low-income families do not go hungry if future federal government shutdowns halt or delay funding for essential food assistance programs. The most recent month-long federal shutdown nearly threatened food security for more than 1.5 million Ohioans, including hundreds of thousands of children, as federal funds for food assistance programs began to dry up. 



 
 

Reps. Holmes, O'Brien Introduce Bill To Increase Funding To Local Communities

 

State Reps. Glenn W. Holmes (D-Girard) and Mike O’Brien (D-Warren) today announced the introduction of House Bill (HB) 578, which would reallocate to local governments nearly 40 percent of fees paid by outside companies to store fracking wastewater in Ohio injection wells.