Freedom is never a given. Its pursuit is not always easy. It often demands the sacrifice of those willing to give of themselves for a greater cause. It’s these values that most exemplify our nation’s veterans, many of whom sacrificed so much to secure the freedoms we too often take for granted. 


Veterans Day began as Armistice Day, a holiday marking the one-year anniversary of the end of World War I. It quickly became a celebration of all our veterans who gave of themselves to defend our freedom and way of life. Because of their selflessness and determination, we are able to enjoy many of the freedoms we cherish today.


The House last month unanimously passed House Bill 194, legislation to create special license plates recognizing military service. The legislation, sponsored by state Rep. Hearcel Craig (D-Columbus), a military veteran, is a testament to House Dems’ long-standing commitment to honoring Ohio’s military veterans. We understand that truly honoring our veterans isn’t just about offering them thanks, it’s about advocating on their behalf, fighting for their benefits and affording them the opportunity to succeed when they return home.


This year, as we gather to give thanks for the blessings in our lives – our health, our families, our freedom – let’s also give thanks for our veterans whose continued sacrifices impact our everyday lives. Join the Ohio House Dems in celebrating and honoring our military veterans, their families and the freedoms they fought for this Veterans Day.

 
 
 
  
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House Dems Respond To GOP's Proposed Wage-killing Unemployment Restrictions

 

The Ohio House Democratic Caucus today responded to the newly unveiled GOP unemployment compensation bill that freezes unemployment compensation for ten years, increases unemployment insurance tax rates from .02 to .03 percent for employers, and adds a new ten-percent tax on employees.

“As Americans we believe in getting paid for the work you do. But now, after helping to build our bottom line in Ohio, working people will take home less pay for doing the same job under this legislation,” said House Democratic Leader Fred Strahorn (D-Dayton). “That’s wrong.”

The legislation also reduces the amount of time a person remains eligible for unemployment insurance by two weeks, from 26 to 24.

“An automatic pay cut is not what most families and people have in mind when I talk to them about the priorities at their statehouse,” added Leader Strahorn. “People are concerned about owning a home, sending kids to school and trying to save what they can to get ahead.”