Often in our day-to-day lives, we may forget the sacrifices made by our greatest public servants – the brave and selfless men and women in the Armed Services. 


We owe them a tremendous debt. The freedoms we enjoy are not free, and the price tag is often grim. We know that we can never repay that debt. We can only acknowledge it, and say, “thank you.” 


The celebration of Memorial Day reminds us of this debt we owe to our veterans and current military members, whose selflessness, sacrifice and courage helps keep our nation safe. 


Memorial Day originated after the American Civil War to commemorate the Union and Confederate soldiers who lost their lives. Originally known as Decoration Day, it was custom to decorate a soldier’s grave with flowers. 


In his 1868 proclamation to set aside this day, General John A. Logan instructed there to be thoughts to “cherish tenderly the memories of our heroic dead who made their breast a barricade between our country and its foes.” 


Memorial Day was finally recognized as a national holiday in 1971, when Congress passed the National Holiday Act. 


Since its inception, Memorial Day has evolved into a celebration to pay tribute to all who have fought and defended our country in the various wars throughout the years, including the ongoing military efforts that our brave men and women find themselves in today in the Middle East. 


Let us use this time to remember the true meaning of Memorial Day, and honor those who gave our state and nation so much, including many valiant Ohio sons and daughters

 
 
 
  
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House Dems Respond To GOP's Proposed Wage-killing Unemployment Restrictions

 

The Ohio House Democratic Caucus today responded to the newly unveiled GOP unemployment compensation bill that freezes unemployment compensation for ten years, increases unemployment insurance tax rates from .02 to .03 percent for employers, and adds a new ten-percent tax on employees.

“As Americans we believe in getting paid for the work you do. But now, after helping to build our bottom line in Ohio, working people will take home less pay for doing the same job under this legislation,” said House Democratic Leader Fred Strahorn (D-Dayton). “That’s wrong.”

The legislation also reduces the amount of time a person remains eligible for unemployment insurance by two weeks, from 26 to 24.

“An automatic pay cut is not what most families and people have in mind when I talk to them about the priorities at their statehouse,” added Leader Strahorn. “People are concerned about owning a home, sending kids to school and trying to save what they can to get ahead.”