Ohio House Democratic Leader Fred Strahorn (D-Dayton) and the Democratic lead on the House budget panel, state Rep. Jack Cera (D-Bellaire), today released the following joint response regarding the House changes to Gov. Kasich’s proposed two-year state operating budget, House Bill 49:


“With the House’s revised budget, we were able to press pause on six years of Republican tax shifting that forces the middle class and working people to pay more for giveaways to the top one-percent. Through public pressure and awareness, we were also able to get Republicans to bring more resources to the statewide fight against heroin and opioids. But the simple fact is, the state is in trouble today because of the GOP’s failed economic policies of the last six years.


“Because of failed tax shifting policies, the state has less money today than what was expected six years ago – less money to devote to schools, making college affordable, fighting the opioid epidemic, and investing in our communities. Instead of making our state stronger for generations to come, working people and families are feeling the squeeze of these upside-down economic policies, and now the results are becoming real for lawmakers who are under a constitutional oath to pass a balanced budget.


“With new revenue numbers coming out Thursday, we have serious concerns about the bill we are expected to vote on prior to the release of that new economic data. We are also concerned that failing to invest in schools, college affordability and our communities will only make Ohio’s economic outlook worse.


“We take our fiscal and constitutional responsibility to the people and families of Ohio seriously, and believe the legislature could be risking further economic and financial instability by passing a state budget built on bad assumptions.”

 
 
 
  
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House Dems Respond To GOP's Proposed Wage-killing Unemployment Restrictions

 

The Ohio House Democratic Caucus today responded to the newly unveiled GOP unemployment compensation bill that freezes unemployment compensation for ten years, increases unemployment insurance tax rates from .02 to .03 percent for employers, and adds a new ten-percent tax on employees.

“As Americans we believe in getting paid for the work you do. But now, after helping to build our bottom line in Ohio, working people will take home less pay for doing the same job under this legislation,” said House Democratic Leader Fred Strahorn (D-Dayton). “That’s wrong.”

The legislation also reduces the amount of time a person remains eligible for unemployment insurance by two weeks, from 26 to 24.

“An automatic pay cut is not what most families and people have in mind when I talk to them about the priorities at their statehouse,” added Leader Strahorn. “People are concerned about owning a home, sending kids to school and trying to save what they can to get ahead.”