$131.6 Billion State Budget Clears House With Attacks On Working Ohioans, Tax Cuts For Richest One-percent
Democratic members say budget isn't a responsible plan for the future, doesn't work for middle-class Ohioans
 
 
Rep. Emilia Sykes discussing access to healthcare for pregnant women, breast and cervical cancer coverage, infant mortality

Wednesday, State Rep. Emilia Sykes (D-Akron) and Ohio House Democratic Caucus members stood in opposition to the state’s two-year budget proposal, House Bill 64. Democratic legislators said the bill failed to lay out a real plan for the future of the state and instead advanced partisan attacks on working Ohioans and policies that rig the tax system to help the richest one-percent and special interests.


Democrats offered several alternative proposals* that would have put more money in the pockets of middle class Ohioans, stopped attacks on working Ohioans, ensured equal pay for women, reduced the state’s sales tax and maintained access to healthcare for pregnant working mothers and women needing cancer treatment. The Democratic proposals were shot down along party lines.


“I am very disappointed that the Ohio House has decided against working families by passing this budget,” said Rep. Sykes. “I'm especially disappointed that an amendment I offered that would reduce Ohio's abysmal infant mortality rate was tabled. People say, ‘Show me your budget and I'll show you your priorities.’ The Ohio House showed us that working families, pregnant women, babies and an educated work force are not our priorities."


House Republicans scrapped nearly all of Gov. Kasich’s initial budget proposal, but largely kept the philosophy behind an untargeted income tax cut intact. Democratic representatives expressed disappointment with the House GOP’s move stripping accountability and transparency measures for charter schools out of the state budget even as failing, for-profit charters are set to receive a record amount of taxpayer dollars through the bill. Democrats attempted to remove what they called the “No Charter Left Behind” provision which would give online charter schools $25 per pupil for brick and mortar facilities— something online schools lack.   

 
 
 
  
Featured Posts

Crucial Consumer Protections Headed To Governor's Desk, Says Rep. Sykes

 

State Rep. Emilia Sykes (D-Akron) today applauded the passage of House Bill (HB) 123, a bipartisan effort to enact consumer protections for the thousands of Ohioans who utilize short-term loans every day. Borrowers in Ohio currently pay some of the highest rates in the nation for payday loans, with estimated average interest rates at over 500 percent.



 
 

Rep. Sykes Reminds Constituents To Prepare For Driver's License Renewal Changes

 

State Rep. Emilia Sykes (D-Akron) wants to remind Akron residents that beginning July 2, the procedure for renewing a driver’s license in Ohio will change. The Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV) will now mail new driver’s license cards to the applicant’s home address. A temporary card will be issued at the BMV until the official card arrives in the mail, about 10 days later. Officials say this change will reduce fraud and counterfeit licenses.



 
 

Sykes Statement On Profiling By Capitol Square Security

 

State Rep. Emilia Sykes (D-Akron) today issued the following statement in response to the latest in a string of incidents where she and other black women lawmakers have been subjected to additional security measures when entering the Ohio Statehouse and other government office buildings. Upon entering the Riffe Center in Columbus last week, security officials stopped the Akron-area lawmaker despite her presenting her security access badge.