Cleveland-area Lawmakers Say Ohio Could "amp Up" Economic Growth Through Music Industry
OhioSounds tax incentive would attract recording industry projects, create jobs
Posted June 16, 2015 by Minority Caucus
 
 

State Reps. Kent Smith (D-Euclid) and Sarah LaTourette (R-Bainbridge) today announced a bi-partisan effort to create jobs and drive economic growth by making Ohio a destination for the recording industry. The Ohio Sound Recording Investor Tax Credit, also known as OhioSounds, will work to attract more of the almost $7 billion in annual music industry revenue to the state. 


“Ohio is the birthplace of legendary musicians, unforgettable songs and ‘Rock N’ Roll’,” said Rep. Smith. “OhioSounds honors our proud legacy and works to cultivate a winning model moving forward. Ohio can become a destination for musicians, producers and industry leaders who will create jobs and strengthen our local economies. The OhioSounds tax credit will solidify our commitment to Ohio’s musical heritage and create new music that will provide the soundtrack to our lives.”


“Much like the Ohio film tax credit, this legislation seeks to incentivize investment in Ohio and create jobs in a dynamic industry,” Representative LaTourette stated. “Northeast Ohio has seen quite an investment in response to the film tax credit, with major motion pictures filmed on the streets of Cleveland and throughout our region. Given our history as the birthplace of Rock n’ Roll, it just makes sense to extend that incentive to the music industry and embrace our heritage as musical innovators.”


The proposed tax credit will grant a 25 percent tax credit for sound recording production projects in the state. The incentive program will also return 25 percent of music studio construction and recording infrastructure costs to qualifying participants. To qualify, sound production costs must exceed $5,000 per project, with a maximum tax credit of $50,000 per project and an annual tax credit cap of $3 million. 


Smith and LaTourette’s proposal models a similar tax incentive program in Louisiana, which allows current residents to access credits for music production within the state without an upper cap limit. The Ohio program differs in that the credit is not limited to Ohio residents. However, with an upper limit of $50,000, the lawmakers believe the credit is sustainable.

 

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