Kelly Helps Lead Bipartisan #MoveOver Bill To Make Roads, Citizens, Officers Safer
"Move Over" bill would increase penalties for injuring or killing officers by failing to slow down, change lanes
May 10, 2017
 
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State Rep. Brigid Kelly (D-Cincinnati) today joined the Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) of Ohio and state Rep. Tom Patton (R-Strongsville) to announce bipartisan legislation to enhance officer safety on Ohio’s roadways by strengthening the state’s “Move Over” law. The legislation would increase the penalty when motorists’ failure to slow down and, if possible, change lanes away from law enforcement and roadside emergency vehicles results in the injury or death of an officer. 


“Just as the fearless men and women of Ohio’s police force keep us and our communities safe every day, we must do our part to ensure their safety in the line of duty,” said Kelly. “Strengthening Ohio’s ‘Move Over’ law is one way we can help ensure our officers make it home to their families each night, in addition to making us all safer on Ohio’s roads and highways.” 


Despite the original “Move Over” law taking effect over a decade ago, fatal collisions between Ohio motorists and officers on the side of the road still occur. This past year alone, two officers – Cleveland Officer David Fahey and State Highway Patrol Trooper Kenneth Velez – were struck and killed while attending to law enforcement duties off to the side of the highway.                     


“Too many police are being injured and killed in a completely senseless way, including one officer right here in Ohio earlier this year who was attempting to secure an accident scene,” FOP of Ohio President Jay McDonald said. “We have to educate the public and encourage them to slow down and move over and we have to punish those whose thoughtless actions result in serious injury or death.” 


In conjunction with the legislation, the FOP today announced a new public information campaign to promote safe driving and heightened enforcement of the current “Move Over” law.

 
 
 
  
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